Book Review of Call of the Goddess by Elizabeth N. Love


My book review of Call of the Goddess (Stormflies Book 1) by Elizabeth N. Love51z2b20gyv6l

Call of the Goddess is a mix of science fiction, romance, and mystery. The story centers on the life of a woman, Axandra, whose lineage is entrusted with a burden of carrying a Goddess within them.

I particularly enjoyed the setting, a new utopia created on the distant planet of Bona Dea, by the descendants of interstellar refugees from a desolated earth. Through the entire story, the author does a superb job revealing the alien planet, Bona Dea, from its new constellations to its strange, yet familiar, flora and fauna. The author further defines the setting through the population and its new system of governance, created by a people who do not want to repeat the mistakes of their ancestors. Bona Dea, along with its new inhabitants, and their way of life is well developed and described throughout the story. Axandra, in particular, is well fleshed out and explored.

Unfortunately, I found the pace of the story too slow for my tastes. It did pick up near the very end, but by then it was such a drastic change from the rest of the story as to be jarring and, to me, rushed.

There was romance in the story and the author handled Axandra’s feelings and introspection with care and finesse, but I was disappointed in her partners. Her first relationship with Jon ended abruptly and the reasons for his sudden change in feelings was never thoroughly explained. In the second relationship, I found Quinn to be so love stricken from the offset as to be unbelievable.

Call of the Goddess was okay. It was science fiction, mystery, and romance all brought together and even though it had all these elements mixed in, they just never truly blended into one cohesive whole for me.

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Book Review for God’s Hammer (Hakon’s Saga, #1) by Eric Schumacher


19183470Here is my book review for Eric Schumacher’s first book in the Hakon’s Saga, God’s Hammer.

History, legend, and fiction blend together with an expert hand in “God’s Hammer”, a gripping historical fiction novel by Eric Schumacher.
The novel covers Hakon Haraldsson early life in the court of King Athelstan of England, his foster father, and Hakon’s eventual return to Norway to face his murderous brother, Erik Bloodaxe, in a battle to seize the throne.
I really enjoyed the action and adventure and was quickly drawn in with the great descriptive writing and well developed characters. I especially liked the way historical information was presented in a way that added to the depth of the story and didn’t feel like it was just stuffed in around the edges (like some other historical fiction novels I’ve read). I look forward to reading the next installment of Hakon’s journey and can’t recommend this novel enough.